What to Expect on Safari in Maasai Mara, Kenya

What to Expect on Safari in Maasai Mara, Kenya

Rolling grasslands, graceful acacia trees, sweeping vistas teeming with wildlife, drifting clouds, and sun filled skies. Welcome to Kenya. Home to the some of the richest landscapes and animal life.

Kenya’s most treasured natural resource is the Serengeti Maasai Mara ecosystem – its two names reflect the two countries that share this landscape: Tanzania and Kenya. In the area’s Kenyan north, the landscape varies with winding rivers and greener tint, and is less savannah-like than in the Tanzanian south. The Big Five (lion, leopard, Cape buffalo, rhino, and elephant) inhabit this region along with 500 bird species and a few dozen other mammal species including a half million gazelles, 1.3 million wildebeest, and 200,000 zebras whose famous migration crosses the border between the two countries year after year.

No matter what month you travel in, there is plenty of wildlife to experience in Kenya. Bucket list trips require advance planning, so starting several months out will enable you to select the accommodations and itinerary that matches your specific requirements. Need a general introduction to kick start your safari planning? Check out my recent article, Safari Planning Basics. Most Kenya safari itineraries include bush plane flights between several of the country’s regions including Maasai Mara, Mount Kenya, and the Laikipia plateau. Kenya boasts a variety of accommodations ranging from standard hotel-style to the most lux, boutique-style tented experiences.

My recent trip began with a two-night stay in Nairobi. (Click here, to view my article on Planning a Layover in Nairobi). After our city experience, we shuttled to the local airport and boarded a bush plane for an hour flight to Maasai Mara. Upon landing, we were warmly greeted by Maasai villagers with song, dance, and refreshments before climbing into our safari vehicle to head to the lodge. (The Maasai are a semi-nomadic, indigenous tribe whose ancestral territory stretches across Kenya and northern Tanzania). The safari experience started immediately — we stopped along the way to view the wildlife and enjoy a quick walkabout.

Our home for three nights was the Fairmont Mara Safari Club, a beautiful lodge surrounded on three sides by the Mara River. The main lodge area features indoor and outdoor spaces to lounge or dine including an expansive curved wood deck that winds along the riverbank and offers excellent views to the river below.

The lodge’s bedroom tents, generously spaced throughout the lush property, are set up high along the riverbank and offer a bird’s eye view of the hippo families as they lounge along the riverbank, their ears and eyes just visible above the waterline. Each tent is outfitted with a four-poster pillow top bed, private en-suite bathroom, and outdoor verandah. The décor and furnishings reflect the local community incorporating the patterns and rich reds of the Maasai textiles. Although the sides and ceiling of the tented structure are made from canvas, once you pass through the zippered entrance, the lodging more closely resembles the personality and warmth of a finely appointed boutique-hotel suite.

Days start early on safari with continental breakfast brought to your private verandah (look for my video of a tour of the accommodations at the end of this article). Most mornings, I drank my hot coffee under the watchful eyes of visiting silvery-gray vervet monkeys eyeing my plate of biscuits. After a quick walk down the paths to the lodge entrance, we climbed into our safari vehicle stowing our day packs filled with cameras, batteries, phone chargers, and sunglasses. The safari vehicle with its pop-up top and zip-down windows, was outfitted with binoculars, charging stations, wool blankets, and a cooler filled with beverages. Not sure what to bring on your safari? Check out my article, Safari Packing Tips.

Our mornings were spent on long meandering drives across the savannah led by our experienced guide and ambassador. Kenya guides are experts in botany, ornithology, geology, wildlife tracking, and identification. Our guide would radio other guides to share logistics on interesting sightings: a mama couger playing with her cubs, a lion relaxing in the shade of an acacia tree with her young brood, vultures circling a recent kill, or wildebeest and zebra drinking together from a watering hole.

Mid-morning, a full breakfast was served on a grassy plain, under an acacia tree complete with table linens, hot coffee, and a mix of culinary delights. (Plus, a port-o-potty with a view!) With our bellies full, we continued our trek to farther savannahs and then returned to the lodge midday, for a leisurely al fresco lunch.

In the late afternoon, we set out for our next game drive. Every day on safari is unique – there is always something new to see and experience. One day, our guide pulled over to the side of the path and instructed us to quietly tip toe through the brush. Not knowing what to expect, we were mesmerized to come upon a closely guarded rhino kept company by an around-the-clock armed guard to protect against poachers. So sad that these beautiful creatures are so endangered, but happy to know there are local organizations protecting them.

One day, we visited a Maasai village and met the residents and the village elder who gave us a personal tour of his mud home and showed us how to create fire with just sticks. We wandered through their outdoor marketplace and purchased locally made crafts including wooden sculptures, intricate beaded bowls, and richly colored woven blankets. (Look for my video of the Maasai village at the end of this article).

Afternoon game drives slowly stretch out into the early evening and end with partaking in MY most favorite end of safari ritual, “Sundowners,” which is an African happy hour. What’s required? Just sitting by the glowing campfire, cocktail in hand, watching the sun slip below the horizon, and dreaming of the next adventure.

Video of Maasai Village visit
Video of Fairmont Mara Safari Club Accommodations

It’s never TOO early to plan. Would you like to maximize the redemption of your American Express Points? Email me: mollie@herrickstravel.com, and find out about upgrades, special amenities, and VIP service for all Herricks Travel American Express/Altour customers regardless of credit card membership.

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Planning a Layover in Nairobi

Planning a Layover in Nairobi

My recent article highlighted how to jump start your Kenya Safari planning. As I mentioned, a Safari requires advance planning (six months to a year is not unusual), therefore it is wise to start the research while you have some down time. As a Travel Agent, I am here to ensure that your dream trip is seamless from initial inquiry to safe return home and I can help you craft the perfect trip to suit your interests and budget.

International flights to Kenya are routed through centrally located Jomo Kenyatta Airport (JBO). Since most flights arrive in the late afternoon or evening, you will most likely need to stay overnight in Nairobi prior to boarding a bush plane at local airport Wilson. If your schedule allows, I highly recommend staying at least a night or two. Traffic can be daunting in downtown Nairobi, so an overnight stay will allow ample time between experiences and airport transfers. Plus, this will give you a chance to adjust to the new time zone and give you an opportunity to learn a bit about the country, the people, the culture and wildlife prior to embarking on safari. Here are just a few suggestions not to be missed:

Karen Blixen Museum:
“I had a farm in Africa at the foot of the Ngong Hills…” is the famous first line of the novel, Out of Africa, penned by renowned Danish author Karen Blixen. The farm, owned by Karen (pen name Isak Dinesen) and husband Baron Bror von Blixen Fincke, gained international fame after the release of the 1985 epic award-winning drama based on this autobiography. Starring Meryl Streep and Robert Redford, it’s a must-see prior to your visit to Kenya.

Single handedly, Karen (and Streep) inspired a generation of safari goers (and safari chic!). Visit the farmhouse and Museum and step back in time to 1914 when Karen moved to Africa to marry her half cousin and carry out dairy farming in the then British Colony of Kenya. Her husband, however, changed his mind and wanted to farm coffee, which did not go well. After her divorce, Karen was left to run the financially troubled farm on her own, a daunting task for a woman of that generation. She fell in love with an Englishman, Denis Finch Hatton (Redford) and the rest I will not comment on, lest I spoil the movie.

Giraffe Center Wildlife Conservation Park:
On safari, you will of course see hundreds of giraffes in the wild, but at this Nairobi center, created by the African Fund for Endangered Wildlife, you will get up close and personal with the beautiful Rothschild giraffe and even have the opportunity to hand-feed this stately subspecies of the giraffe found only in the grasslands of East Africa. At the time the center was established in 1979, the animals had lost their habitat with only 130 of them remaining. This 60-acre sanctuary started with just two giraffes and now there are over 300 safe and breeding well in various Kenyan National Parks.

Sheldrick Wildlife Trust:
Founded in 1977, this non-profit focuses on anti-poaching and safeguarding the natural environment, enhancing community awareness, addressing animal welfare issues, providing veterinary assistance to animals in need, and rescuing and hand rearing elephant and rhino orphans. The Trust’s main base, the elephant orphanage, often referred to as the Nairobi Nursery, is in Nairobi National Park. As of now, the visitation to the center is closed, but hopefully will resume in the near future so you can witness the care and feeding of these lovely animals up close. In the meantime, you can support the organization by personally “adopting” an orphaned elephant.

Photo credit: Sheldrick Wildlife Trust

Travel with a Purpose:
Including “Purposeful Travel” in any vacation is something easy to do. It’s about engaging in educational and mind-opening experiences that benefit both the traveler and the location, often shining a light on local communities, their needs and their accomplishments. My recent article Travel with a Purpose highlighted my visit to the Harambee Community Center, the non-profit partnership between Micato Safaris and AmericaShare, located in Mukuru, East Nairobi’s densely populated slum. During the pandemic, their school was hit hard, and students risked several months without guided learning which would significantly set back their future performance.  As an update to my article, I am pleased to report that through their Student Sponsorship Program, students were successfully connected to the online world: smartphones were distributed with access to educational apps, resources, and streaming lessons hosted by local teachers in the community. To find out more or donate, please visit AmericaShare.

Photo credit: Micato Safaris & AmericaShare

Travel with a Purpose, Part Two:
Another stop I made during my recent trip to Kenya was to learn about Huru International, which manufactures environmentally friendly, reusable sanitary pads that have been distributed to more than 175,000 girls in Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda. Founded in 2008, this organization addresses an important issue: East African girls cannot afford sanitary pads and very often avoid school during their period resulting in missing as much as an entire month of school yearly. Girls who miss school fall behind, drop out, or even quit which leads to the endless cycle of poverty and gender inequality. Huru Kits are a simple, sustainable, and practical way to tackle this problem. The kits include a colorful drawstring backpack, eight reusable pads, three pairs of undergarments, detergent soap, and educational materials on HIV prevention and reproductive health. The items are replaced on a timely basis.

All Huru supplies are produced in their sprawling factory by women and men from underserved communities who have learned the art of industrial sewing and tailoring, along with lessons on business, finance, and entrepreneurship.  Now, in the age of Covid-19, the production facility in Nairobi is running full steam, producing much needed multilayered cloth face masks that are donated to the residents of Mukuru.

Huru also designs and manufactures lovely reusable, colorful fabric tote bags and lunch bags which we had the opportunity to purchase and bring home — a heartfelt memory of this amazing organization. For more information or to donate, please visit Huru International.

Ready to plan your next adventure? It’s never TOO early to plan. Would you like to maximize the redemption of your American Express Points? Email me: mollie@herrickstravel.com, and find out about upgrades, special amenities, and VIP service for all Herricks Travel American Express/Altour customers regardless of credit card membership

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Kenya Safari Planning Basics

Kenya Safari Planning Basics

Now that we have turned the calendar page and put 2020 behind us, it’s time to think positive, look forward and plan for future travel. It’s the perfect time to put some serious thought into a bucket list trip: an African Safari. A safari is a magical and unique experience that envelopes you in nature, culture, and history. Safaris enrich the mind, stretch the imagination, calm the soul, and encourage self-reflection. Out of the many countries our two sons have visited with us, our safari experiences definitely stand out as most memorable. This is an itinerary that requires advance planning to ensure availability in the more intimate and authentic tented camps and lodges, arrange for visas, as well as inquire about any necessary inoculations. As a travel agent, I can help ensure the entire process runs smoothly from initial inquiry, to your safe return home.

LOCATION
A relatively small country in East Africa, Kenya’s capital and central transportation hub is Nairobi. Travelers fly into the international airport Jomo Kenyatta, while connecting flights within Kenya or to neighboring countries are booked from Wilson, the domestic airport just next door. After a short stay in Nairobi (most international flights arrive in the evening), you will reach the other areas of the country primarily by bush plane. There’s plenty to explore within Kenya, but if you have more time, a Kenya safari can be booked in conjunction with a visit to Tanzania (to the south), Uganda (to the west) or Rwanda (to the south west). These countries, plus 15 others, comprise what is known as East Africa.

LANDSCAPE
When compared with popular safari destination South Africa (located in the southernmost point on the African continent,) Kenya has a more temperate climate. To learn more, check out my previous articles on South Africa Safaris: here. The further north in Kenya you travel, the drier and hillier the landscape becomes as the area doesn’t benefit as much from the rains received in the south-west of Kenya. Because it shares its longest border with Tanzania, Southern Kenya is the best place to see glacier-capped Mount Kilimanjaro, the highest peak in Africa and the tallest free-standing mountain in the world.

GAME VIEWING
Fantastic year-round game viewing makes Kenya a TOP safari location. Although it is a “Big 5” destination in the sense that lion, leopard, buffalo, elephant and rhino are found here, it’s difficult to see them all in the same place. Rhinos are the rarest and most difficult to find and unfortunately, due to poachers, have become a critically endangered species. Safari itineraries will often include overnight stays in Maasai Mara, Amboseli, Samburu, Mt. Kenya, or the Laikipia Reserve in order to increase the variety of game viewing.

Kenya is the perfect place for first-time safari goers – because the land is so flat and open, it’s easy to enjoy 360-degree views and spot game throughout the year. Roads are well-maintained and English is widely spoken throughout the country. Long-standing conservation projects in Kenya also means that animals are generally plentiful and in good condition. Special relationships between tribal landowners, the government, conservationists, and safari operators mean that the needs of humans, nature, and agriculture are carefully balanced.

MAASAI MARA
Kenya’s most well known wildlife gem is the Great Migration: the 1,900-mile journey of over two million wildebeest (and zebra and gazelle) as they follow the rains over the Mara River into the Maasai Mara National Reserve where they feast on thousands of hectares of fresh grazing land. They stay for about four to five months, slowly mowing the Mara between approximately July and November when they cross back into Tanzania’s Serengeti region. (Only humans require a passport to cross this border!) The massive herds also attract large predators including lion, leopard, hyena and the occasional cheetah, therefore witnessing a “kill” on safari is most likely to occur during this time period.

Our guide took us on a bush walk to visit a rhino, heavily guarded against poachers

The main reason the Maasai Mara attracts the Migration is because its open, flat savannah dotted with flat-topped acacia trees, provides superb grazing. The wide landscape gives you that classic “safari look” with green grass turning golden as the seasons change. It’s impossible to know exactly when wildebeest will cross the Mara River – they don’t all cross in one place at the same time. Large groups can be viewed at different points and on different days. This unpredictability and sense of exploration is what makes safaris so exciting.

Subscribe to my blog to read my upcoming articles on Kenya including Safari Packing Tips, Weekend in Nairobi, and specifics on Maasai Mara, Mt. Kenya, and the Laikipia Reserve.

Need help planning your Bucket-list Trip?

It’s never TOO early to plan. Would you like to maximize the redemption of your American Express Points? Email me: mollie@herrickstravel.com, and find out about upgrades, special amenities, and VIP service for all Herricks Travel American Express/Altour customers regardless of credit card membership

Become a SUBSCRIBER and receive all my latest articles right to your inbox: look for the “subscribe to this blog by email” box and then respond to the follow-up email. For more information on my trip planning services, please click HERE

Travel with a Purpose: Kenya

Travel with a Purpose: Kenya

Safaris are magical, otherworldly experiences, wholly unlike other journeys. Not just transported to a foreign land, you are completely immersed in nature, culture, food, history. Safaris enrich the mind, stretch the imagination, calm the soul, and encourage self-reflection. A typical day? Rise with the sun and enjoy a peaceful breakfast in the wilderness; hold your breath while a mamma lion brushes up against your safari vehicle; dance with Masai warriors upon exiting a bush plane; tour a proud village elder’s mud hut; quietly tip toe through the brush to gaze at the majesty of a carefully guarded rhino; contemplate a flawless night sky and the Milky Way stretching over the evening bonfire.

But, my recent trip to Kenya included an even MORE unique experience, thanks to Micato Safaris and its nonprofit arm, AmericaShare. A recent article in AFAR magazine reminded me of what made this safari so memorable. Our two-week travel industry familiarization trip to Kenya and Tanzania hosted by Micato included a visit to one of the organizations supported by this award-winning travel company: the Harambee Community Center. Located in Mukuru, East Nairobi’s densely populated slum, this center left an indelible impression, and reminded me that travel for enjoyment can also include travel with a purpose: to open your heart and mind and shine a necessary light on causes and people around the world.

Packed into Mukuru are 500,000 people whose daily income barely exceeds four dollars. The township lacks basic formal infrastructure, running water, electricity, and sanitation. Its residents live in tiny one-roomed corrugated iron shacks with up to twenty families sharing a communal water tap and toilet.

AmericaShare, founded over 30 years ago, is dedicated to improving the lives of the children living in Mukuru. Through education and community outreach programs, they provide disadvantaged children with access to basic education resources to facilitate sustainable change. Many children in Mukuru cannot afford to consistently attend school. While public primary school tuition fees are covered by the government, hidden costs, such as uniforms, books, and lunch fees keep children from attending.

Harambee CenterOur travel agent group was brought to the Harambee Center – it means “Let’s Pull Together” in Swahili.  The center is a multi-purpose facility – a bright and beautiful oasis of hope and green space in the middle of the Mukuru slum. A vital community center, it allows residents to gather for lectures, educational sessions, and meetings. Our visit (pre-pandemic) included a tour of the classrooms, lending library, and computer resource building. Students of all ages were seated shoulder to shoulder at tables, quietly doing homework, studying for exams, and forming study groups. The library is stocked with over twenty thousand books, including novels, textbooks, and study guides. Books are a rare gift in Mukuru; many schools do not have adequate textbooks, and novels are a luxury most cannot afford.

AmericaShare has programs aimed at helping children living in poverty remain in school, giving them the opportunity to learn as every child deserves. For every trip booked with Micato Safaris, the company sends one child to school. Now in the age of COVID-19, AmericaShare’s mission has become even MORE dire: providing protective masks and organizing food donations to help ameliorate the increasing problem of hunger, something that is running rampant worldwide. Now, keeping kids from falling behind due to the recent closure of schools is even more paramount. New rules on social distancing and the lack of smart phones, tablets, or even the internet, severely limits digital learning.

Harambee Center

Harambee CenterI was grateful for the opportunity to see this organization’s efforts in action and help shine a light on their mission. Although the residents are faced with the daily challenge of survival, our visit to Harambee included an opportunity to see the children’s commitment to education, positivity, and kinship.

Our tour ended with a jubilant musical performance by the children (see video linked below). As the singing concluded, the children enveloped us and welcomed each of us into their circle, forever leaving their mark on our hearts and our souls. To learn more about AmericaShare and make a donation click here.

Click on photo to view video:

Need help putting together your Bucket-list Trip or Dream Vacation? It’s never TOO early to plan. Would you like to maximize the redemption of your American Express Points? Email me: mollie@herrickstravel.com, and find out about upgrades, special amenities, and VIP service for all Herricks Travel American Express/Altour customers regardless of credit card membership.

To view this complete article online and read my previous articles, use this link: uniquefamilytraveler.com.

Become a SUBSCRIBER and receive all of my latest articles right to your inbox: look for the “subscribe to this blog by email” box and then respond to the follow-up email.

For more information on my trip planning services, please click HERE.

Mukuru and Harambee Center exterior photos courtesy of AmericaShare.

Safari Packing Tips

Safari Packing Tips

Light luggage, light heart

The rule “less is more” definitely applies when packing for an African safari.  Unburdening yourself from the usual travel trappings is liberating.   On our recent family trip to South Africa we journeyed from city to safari and back again hopping from lodge to lodge by bush plane (click here to read my recent posts).  Not worrying about our “stuff” added to the spirit of adventure.  Need advice on what (or what NOT) to pack for your safari?  Here are my top tips:

Thank you Micato Safaris for the great duffle bags

WEATHER:
Weather can vary based on the country and the time of year (seasons may be opposite of your home country). Wintertime in the southern hemisphere (June through September) means as you travel north (towards the equator) temps go up, with the reverse being true in their summer (December — March).  Kenya and Tanzania, located in East Africa, have milder, spring-like weather year-round verses South Africa, which has much greater temperature swings.  No matter the destination, early morning and late evening game drives can be cooler than when the sun is high in the sky.

LUGGAGE SIZE:
Luggage requirements (weights and measurements) vary by airline carrier, so check these in advance, especially the baggage allowed on small bush planes. For our safari, a medium sized rolling duffle bag with exterior zippered pockets to store non-valuables worked perfectly.

SHOES:
Shoes take up lots of room, so choose carefully. Hiking boots are only necessary if you plan on trekking or mountain climbing. On safari, you are traveling mostly by vehicle, but hard soled, comfortable shoes are a must for bush walks.  Over the ankle hiking boots are bulky, so a better option are walking or hiking shoes (preferably with waterproof Gortex, like North Face or Merrells).  Flip flops come in handy for the lodge pool or Jacuzzi.  And, slip-on style leather sneakers are convenient for airport security and work well for “in between” weather patterns. Touring Johannesburg and Cape Town during their winter?  Pack a pair of light weight leather ankle booties with rubber soles for cool or rainy days.

CLOTHING:
Layers, layers, layers.  Simple and neat, casual clothing, whether you are in the city or on safari, always works best.  Even in warmer weather, long pants and long sleeve shirts made from quick-dry or dri-FIT material will protect you from strong sun and mosquitoes. Wear a short sleeve shirt or tank top underneath for quick changes en route when the mercury rises.  Leggings or jeans are okay, but leave the trendy, ripped ones at home.  Ventilated trousers (like REI, prAna, or KUHL) are a great option and will keep you cool and dry.

Sabi Sabi Safari

As the sun sets, long sleeves and trousers work best

Pack clothing that can be washed (not dry cleaned) since many lodges provide complimentary same-day laundry service).  Pick neutral colors and leave the brights at home.  No camouflage patterns – it is simply not acceptable.  And, keep away from brash, logo t-shirts – it’s best to blend in.

When temps drop, most lodges will provide warm blankets or hot water bottles in the open-air vehicles, but come prepared with scarf, wool beanie, glove liners, fleece jacket, and light-weight quilted vest, because when the sun sets it gets cold!  Heavy winter boots and coats are not necessary — but I definitely appreciated my flannel pajamas during our visit in July!  In the cooler evenings in Cape Town and Johannesburg, I made good use of light weight merino wool cardigans that were easily layered (and didn’t take up much room in the luggage).

Sabi Sabi Safari

Dress in neutral attire that will not “attract” animals, especially when spending time outside the vehicle during a “Sundowners” break

Outdoor dining at the lodges is very popular, but dressing up for dinner is generally unnecessary; it’s more relaxed than you think, even at the luxury tented camps.  Usually, we went right from our evening drive to our al fresco dinner.

Other important items?  A brimmed hat and bathing suit for warm, sunny days and rain shell and collapsible umbrella for rainy days.  And, if you have read my previous packing article (click here) you will know I never travel without a wrap or Pashmina!

Mini surge protector

ELECTRONICS:
Bring extra batteries, memory cards, and lens cloths for your camera (dust gets everywhere) plus power packs for your phone. Converters and adapters will be required for most electronics, and a mini surge protector always is useful in any hotel room where outlets may be few and hard to reach. During game drives, my boys also made good use of binoculars — great for children who may not be using a camera or spotting wildlife through a zoom lens.

This adapter kit works with all Apple devices

Many lodges provide flashlights, but pack one of those mini mag lights just in case — lodges can be pitch-dark at night (although for safety reasons, you are usually escorted back to your tent by a guide). Most lodges include a hairdryer so skip packing this heavy item (and wear that hat you packed!)    Make sure to download books to your e-reader in advance because wifi and cell service can be unpredictable, or better yet, bring an actual book or travel-sized board game – since being “off the grid” is really the point.

SAFARI DAY-PACK:
Take a tote bag or a light weight backpack to use in the safari vehicle to store your camera and the extra layers of clothing you may shed (it can double as your carry on).  Make sure it has a zipper to keep your items dust-free (the bag usually winds up on the floor during all that off-road driving).

MEDICINE & FIRST AID:
Assemble a well-stocked first aid kit in a waterproof bag (check to see if the country you are visiting allows ziploc bags).  Include extra prescription medications (an antibiotic script, just in case) plus over-the-counter meds like ibuprofen, allergy and diarrhea tablets, cortisone cream, motion sickness pills, dry-eye drops, hand sanitizer, bug spray, sunscreen, and adhesive bandages.

Packing cubes

PRE-PACKING:
Before placing items in your bag, lay out your things by item type and then remove one item from each category – you will not miss them!  If traveling between several lodges, I recommend those flat, zippered, nylon pouches to arrange your stuff.   You can lift them from suitcase to dresser drawer and back again without having to repack each individual item.

DONATIONS:
Handing out toys, pens, and candies to local children you meet along the way is strongly discouraged because it creates an endless cycle of begging. Instead, search out a “Social Enterprise,” an organization that runs as a business with profits going to support a community project or social need — buy locally made handicrafts or stop at a community-run store or café. Upon your return home, make a donation to a cause that has pulled at your heartstrings be it animal conservation, children’s charity, or land preservation.  Your dollars, euros, or pounds will go a long way to helping our planet and all who dwell on it.

Sabi Sabi Safari

During our stay in Sabi Sabi, we visited a local community and the “Swa Vana Center,” which cares for orphaned and vulnerable children by offering physical, emotional, social, and educational support.

Sabi Sabi Safari

We stopped in a local market and met the proprietor.

Sabi Sabi Safari

After shopping at a local crafts market, we were treated to a performance of music and dancing.

Sabi Sabi Safari

The local children loved “hamming it up” for the camera

Our visit to the local communities in the Mpumalanga Province was an enriching and educational experience

PAPERWORK:
Check your travel documents — having the proper paperwork is crucial.  LOOK AT YOUR PASSPORT EXPIRATION DATE: it cannot expire prior to six months from the dates of your trip. If you have LESS thank six months left on the expiration you will NOT be allowed to checkin at the airport or board your departure flight! Make sure you secured the appropriate visas to enter a country. South Africa requires all children under the age of 18 to possess a valid birth certificate with a raised seal, in addition to a valid passport (even if traveling with both parents).  Many countries may require proof of inoculations so check the cdc.gov website (or visit a doctor that specializes in travel related immunizations) to learn about recommended shots.

For more packing advice, check out my recent articles: “Twelve Packing Tips Every Traveler Should Know” and  “A Few of my Favorite Travel Things.”

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Tintswalo, Manyeleti Safari

Tintswalo, Manyeleti Safari

Our recent journey to South Africa opened our eyes and our hearts to a new world. In Cape Town we walked in the footsteps of former President Nelson Mandela and learned of his struggle for freedom and the true definition of leadership (click here for my previous posts on Cape Town). On safari in Sabi Sands we spotted the Big Five and the Magnificent Seven in all their four-legged glory. (Click here for my articles on Sabi Sabi).

The next leg of our adventure continues here… We flew north by bush plane to Manyeleti, another private game reserve adjacent to Kruger National Park, which is located in the northeastern part of the country, bordering Mozambique and Zimbabwe. We were met at the dirt airstrip by our guide, Alister, and tracker, Pardon, who whisked us off into the bush to our lodge, Tintswalo.

Wildebeast, Tintswalo, Manyeleti

Wildebeest exhibit the largest animal migration in the world

TIntswalo Lodge, Manyeleti

In a pride, all the lionesses are related

Tintswalo, Manyeleti

Leopards are nocturnal. During the day , they rest in thick brush or in trees.

Tintswalo, Manyeleti

During three days of game drives we caught sight of lions, buffalo, kudu, nyala, zebra, wildebeest, and fox and absorbed lessons in all manner of flora and fauna. The most important, but tragic animal fact we learned? That extreme poaching continues to run rampant in South Africa.

After dinner one evening in the lodge, Alister showed us a heart wrenching video that portrayed the devastating realities of this slaughter. Rhino poaching has escalated in recent years, primarily driven by the demand for its horn, specifically in Vietnam. Often associated with traditional Chinese Medicine, it has evolved into a status symbol displayed to mark success or wealth. Poachers are funded by international criminal organizations that provide sophisticated equipment and substantial bounties to track and kill rhinos. The animal is tranquilized and then the horn is brutally hacked off its snout – the animal left to die a slow and painful death, often in full view of its offspring.

Hoedspruit, South Africa

At the Hoedspruit Center for Endangered Species, orphaned rhinos are nurtured

One afternoon, we visited the nearby Hoedspruit Endangered Species Center to learn more. This unique facility focuses on the conservation and sustainability of rare, vulnerable and endangered species in South Africa. Through education of surrounding communities, tourism, breeding, rehabilitation and anti-poaching initiatives, HESC aims to make a difference in the long-term survival of the planet and its animal inhabitants. The rhino, second largest land mammal after the elephant, specifically has borne the brunt of poaching, which has led to near extinction.

Tintswalo Lodge Suite

Tintswalo Lodge – suite bathroom

In between our excursions and twice-daily game drives from Tintswalo, we relaxed in our two-bedroom Baines Suite, named for the nineteenth century English artist and explorer.  The suite includes a living room, kitchen, dining room, and chef.  Our boys were delighted when creatures great and small visited the suite’s backyard plunge pool. On occasion, the front desk rang our rooms to alert us that a herd of elephants had arrived for their daily drink at the watering hole located in full view of the restaurant terrace.

Tinstwalo Lodge, Manyeleti

Tintswalo’s suites, all named for 19th century explorers, feature exquisite colonial era decor

Tintswalo, Manyeleti

Tintswalo Lodge, Manyeleti

A Waterbuck visits our suite’s backyard plunge pool

On our last morning, we bid a sad farewell to Tintswalo as we joined the other guests for a “bushveld” breakfast. Our lovely al fresco buffet, laid out along a dry riverbed under the tallest of olive trees, was a symphony of sights and smells — the brewed coffee and roasted bacon mixing pleasingly with the aromas of the surrounding dried brush grasses.

Tintswalo Lodge, Manyeleti

Almost daily, this herd visits the lodge watering hole

Tintswalo Lodge, Mayeleti

The wooden boardwalk connects all of the lodge’s suites to the main lobby, restaurant, and library

Tintswalo Lodge, Manyeleti

A farewell breakfast in the bush

As we boarded our safari vehicle and headed back to the landing strip to await our flight to Johannesburg, we reflected on our safari experiences, pondered the interdependence of humans and wildlife, and recognized the impact this intertwined relationship has on the world’s survival.

Tintswalo Lodge, Manyeleti

Sundowners at Tintswalo — a highlight of our stay

Check out my son Harris’s video, below, of a herd of Cape Buffalo we encountered during one of our evening game drives. (You can watch all of his adventure and travel videos on his Vimeo Channel – The Suburban Sportsman)

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Sabi Sands Safari

Sabi Sands Safari

When visiting South Africa, the goal is to see the “Big Five” game animals: lion, elephant, buffalo, leopard, and rhinoceros. The term was originally coined by hunters to represent the five species most difficult to hunt on foot, but has since been adopted by the tourism industry to denote optimum viewing experiences.  Adding in two additional animals — the hyena and cheetah –means that you have also achieved the “Magnificent Seven.” Although never a guarantee, we were very fortunate to sight all seven animals during our safari.

My recent articles highlighted my family’s adventure in South Africa — truly a trip of a life time. Our journey began in Cape Town (read recent articles here) where we enjoyed city, wineland, and national park exploration. Next, we hopped a bush plane to reach the next leg of our trip — safari in Sabi Sands (for safari planning tips, click here).  We stayed in Little Bush Camp, located in one of the great private reserves adjacent to Kruger National Park. To read about our experience at this amazing lodge, click here.

Sabi Sabi South Africa

Out of the hundreds and hundreds of photos we snapped, it is impossible to play favorite. So, here are just a few that will give you a small taste of the wild and wonderful creatures we encountered during out travels in Sabi Sabi:

Sabi Sabi South Africa
Sabi Sabi South Africa

Sabi Sabi South Africa

At a kill, a lion tends to gorge himself and can consume up to 25 percent of its body mass in only a few hours. Afterwards, a rest is much needed!

Sabi Sands South Africa

Sabi Sands South Africa

We came upon this matriarchal breeding herd of elephants. The females can be identified by their tusks, which are smaller than the males’.

Sabi Sabi South Africa

The African Buffalo, also known as the Cape Buffalo, can travel amongst very large herds and can spend up to 18 hours a day foraging and moving.

Sabi Sabi South Africa

The Greater Kudu, noted for its long and twisted antlers, is related to the antelope.

Sabi Sabi South Africa

Sabi Sabi South Africa

Sabi Sabi South Africa

The cheetah is the fastest land animal. We were lucky to catch him at rest, mid-meal.

Sabi Sabi South Africa

The leopard’s whiskers help guide it through the thick vegetation and compliments its excellent night vision making it a lethal predator.

Sabi Sabi South Africa

Sabi Sands South Africa

We witnessed these wild dogs as they pursued an impala. Our safari vehicle could barely keep up with them as they raced through the bush —  the dogs’ initial speeds can top 66 kilometers per hour.

Sabi Sabi South Africa

Sabi Sabi South AfricaSabi Sands South Africa

Despite the giraffe’s long neck, it contains only seven vertebrae — the same number as a human and most mammals.

Sabi Sabi South Africa

The hyenas’ bite is the most powerful of all mammals and will crush the thick bones of their prey in order to access the nutritious marrow contained within. Seeing (and hearing!) them in action in the pitch darkness was an intense sight to behold.

Sabi Sabi South Africa

Sabi Sabi South Africa

Sabi Sands South Africa

The beautiful stripes of the zebra actually serve a purpose: to effectively heat and cool the animal.

Sabi Sabi South Africa

Sabi Sabi South Africa

We followed along in our vehicle as this leopard, which had suffered an injury in a fight with another animal, walked the stream bed in search of water.

Sabi Sabi South Africa

Wildebeest have many predators: lion, leopard, cheetah and wild dog.

Sabi Sabi South Africa

All creatures great and small are part of the safari experience. Here a dwarf mongoose peaks out of his home, a repurposed termite mound.

Sabi Sabi South Africa

Hippos cannot float, which is why they are often seen resting in shallow water.

Sabi Sands South Africa

We couldn’t help but name this hornbill “Zazu” in honor of the character in the movie “The Lion King.”

Sabi Sands South Africa Warthog

And, not far away we spotted his “Lion King” companion, “Pumbaa,” otherwise known as a warthog.

Sabi Sands South Africa

Impalas are known for their characteristic stripes, but only the males have horns.

Sabi Sabi South Africa

Sabi Sabi South Africa

Unfortunately, rhinos are being hunted into near extinction. More about this in an upcoming article highlighting our visit to Tinstwalo Safari Lodge, located in the Manyeleti Private Preserve.

 

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Little Bush Camp, Sabi Sabi

Little Bush Camp, Sabi Sabi

Half way through our South African safari, I knew this trip was unique when my two sons said: “this is THE best vacation!”  I knew exactly what they meant.  Knowing of their travel experience to 37 countries, people always ask: “what’s your favorite destination?”  They could not play favorite … until our recent trip to South Africa.  Combining history and culture, with stunning landscapes and wildlife encounters, this vacation checked all the adventure boxes.  While Cape Town and Johannesburg were a history lesson come alive, safari was nature in four dimensions: big sky, vast plains, majestic creatures, and a spiritual other-worldliness.

I dreamed of Africa… and still am.
Little Bush Camp, Sabi Sabi
After leaving Cape Town (read my recent articles here), we flew to Johannesburg and then hopped a bush plane to the landing strip in Sabi Sands, a private reserve adjacent to Kruger National Park. (For more details on this private reserve, read my article here).   We were met by our safari vehicle and whisked away on dirt roads to Little Bush Camp, a Sabi Sabi lodge comprised of six thatched-roof suites, each with private viewing deck all overlooking the banks of the Msuthlu River.Little Bush Camp, Sabi Sabi

Little Bush Camp, Sabi Sabi

Little Bush Camp, Sabi Sabi

Little Bush Camp Lodge

We were greeted warmly by our hosts and given instructions on safari schedules, dining, and excursions. My husband and I checked into one cottage, and my two sons next door in their own.   Our three days in the bush were a whirlwind of game drives and animal sightings. Awoken by our guide, Aniska, at 6am each morning, we joined our lodge mates by the fireplace in the main lodge for a much needed cup of hot tea and plates of fresh fruit, homemade muffins, and warm scones. At the end of the garden path, we boarded our Land Cruiser, which we shared with a lovely honeymoon couple from Australia.  Our visit was in July (winter in the southern hemisphere), so early mornings were brisk and required extra layers, including wool cap, gloves, and scarf.  Blankets and hot water bottles placed on our seats in the open-top vehicle came in VERY handy.
Little Bush Camp
Little Bush Camp, Sabi Sabi
Our morning drives lasted approximately three hours, after which we would return to the lodge to eat a hearty breakfast and then spend time relaxing and reading in our huts.  Intermittent Wi-Fi and sporadic cell service were a blessing, giving us a chance to really “power down” on this vacation.

Following our alfresco lunch there were activities available: a visit to one of the other Sabi Sabi lodges, an excursion to the local community to learn about their culture and history, or a bush walk on guided walking trails outside the lodge’s perimeter.  Upon our return, we would grab extra fleece jackets and vests (having shed them because the midday sun can be exceptionally strong even in winter) and embark on the evening drive.

Little Bush Camp, Sabi Sabi

In Sabi Sands, the guides can take you off-road into the bush

Sabi Sands, South Africa
Little Bush Camp, Sabi Sabi
The highlight of the evening drives was “Sundowners,” South Africa’s very civilized version of “Happy Hour.” As dusk arrived, our guide pulled over in an open grassland and set out a lovely spread of snacks and beverages on a fold-down shelf perched on the front of the vehicle. With hiking boots on the ground, we had the opportunity to see, hear, and feel the bush up close as we watched the setting sun.

At nightfall, we drove back to the lodge where we were greeted by a candlelit dinner. We joined our lodge mates and guides at a large family table for an intimate evening of conversation and safari story telling by moonlight. After our meal, exhausted, we retired to our thatched cottages escorted by a guide with a lantern to ward off wandering wildlife. (Leaving your accommodations on your own in the dark is discouraged — the lodge’s fencing only keeps out larger animals like elephants).
Sabi Sabi
Sabi Sabi
Sabi Sabi
Our guide/driver, Aniska, was a “bush baby” who grew up in the local area and was well versed in all creatures great and small. All the lodge guides work together as a team, seamlessly communicating their location and animal sightings by radio so multiple vehicles don’t overwhelm the wildlife.   My sons loved when Aniska went into full “Ferrari safari mode,” racing off to see a unique sighting — wild dogs pursusing a herd of impala or a cheetah devouring its kill — before it disappeared into the bush.

Seated at the very front of our vehicle was Voster, our tracker, who hails from the Shangaan village which abuts the game reserve. These experts are completely in tune with the many clues and hidden signs that animals leave behind, be it foot print or dung heap, and work hand in hand with the guides to track the game and provide you with the up-close wildlife encounters this area is famous for.

Sabi Sabi

Enjoying “Sundowners” with our tracker and guide

One evening, Aniska parked on an empty plain, turned off the vehicle lights, and in the pitch darkness, we gazed up at the pristine night sky — the lack of light pollution allowed for an endless blanket of stars.  With her laser pointer she highlighted the Southern Cross and Milky Way and we even caught a glimpse of the International Space Station silently making its way across the universe.  Wow, how very small we are.

It is hard to put into words all of the sights we saw, each more wondrous than the next. Viewing animals in their natural habitats, existing together (and yes, sometimes eating each other!) truly illustrates the “circle of life” no matter how cliche it sounds — queue the “Lion King” score.  Each night, at bedtime, we scrolled through the hundreds upon hundreds of photos we snapped and reflected on the day’s adventures, so very thankful that it was not just a dream.

Stay tuned for more photos of our animal sightings in Sabi Sands and articles on our second safari stop in Manyeleti Private Reserve plus tips on packing.
Little Bush Camp, Sabi Sabi
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South African Safari Logistics

South African Safari Logistics

When planning a South African safari, the name Kruger immediately comes to mind.  This National Park (the size of Wales) is located in the northeastern part of the country, with neighbor Zimbabwe to the north and Mozambique to the east.  It offers popular camping spots and self-drive tours with a variety of accommodations (mostly run by the National Parks board).  However, if you are looking for a more unique, intimate safari experience in South Africa, a stay in one of the adjacent, private reserve areas is the key to a memorable trip of a lifetime.

Map of South Africa

Sabi Sands Private Reserve is a wildlife conservation private reserve, (the oldest privately owned reserve in South Africa) which means it is not available to day-visitors.   Considered part of the Greater Kruger Wildlife Enclave, it covers roughly 250 square miles. A reservation for one of the lodges is required for entry. Sabi Sands derives its name from the two rivers, River Sabi and River Sand, which flow through the savannah and woodland areas that sustain the diverse flora and fauna.   The western perimeter is fenced, however the eastern perimeter (which adjoins Kruger) is 50 kilometers of unfenced border allowing wildlife to roam freely.  This is not a “zoo” – animals are not “fed.” They are existing in their own biodiverse and natural environment (except for water sources that were part of the original agricultural land).  It’s home to the most sought after animal sightings: the Big Five (buffalo, elephant, rhino, lion, leopard), the Magnificent Seven (Big Five plus the wild dog and cheetah), and 300 species of birds.

Sabi Sands South Africa

A safari in Sabi Sands gets you face to face with the the Big Five

Sabi Sands Reserve Map

Sabi Sands Reserve map

Sabi Sands lodges include meals and off-road safari privileges with an experienced guide in a designated Jeep or vehicle. (In Kruger National Park, you must stick to paved roads, which means you cannot follow a stalking leopard into the bush or an wild dog pursing its prey).  It is divided into several privately owned game reserves including Sabi Sabi, Ulusaba, Singita, and Londolozi, each with its own set of individual lodging areas from modest to luxury.  Some are more child-friendly, while others cater to honeymoon couples or small groups.  Some come equipped with private pool, private deck, or connecting suites. Some lodges have only six or eight villas – a more intimate experience – while others offer amenities like a spa, resort pool, or kids club. All provide other activities besides safari, including visits to the local communities and bush walks.

Sabi Sands rhino

Up close and personal with a rhino, one of the Big Five

Leopard in Sabi Sands

Sabi Sands is well known for its leopard sightings

Our stay this past July was in Little Bush Camp located in the Sabi Sabi Private Game Reserve.  Sabi Sabi has four lodges, each with its own distinct style and flavor: colonial themed Selati, family-friendly Bush Lodge, ecofriendly Earth Lodge, and Little Bush Camp, which features six individual huts all nestled on the banks of the Msuthlu river.

How to get to Sabi Sands? There are several choices including taking a scheduled commercial flight from Johannesburg or Cape Town to local airports in Nelspruit (towards the southern area of Sabi Sands) or Hoedspruit (closer to the northern part of Sabi Sands) then transferring to your lodge by vehicle or “bush plane” depending on travel distance.

South Africa, Federal Air

Boarding our bush plane in Joburg

The most efficient way is by chartered flight on Federal Air, based out of OR Tambo airport in Johannesburg, which takes you directly to the various private reserve landing strips (some paved, some not so much) all within Sabi Sands.

After spending several days in Cape Town, (check out my recent articles here) we flew from Cape Town to Johannesburg on a scheduled South African Airways flight then transferred by minivan to a Federal Air flight. Located a short drive from the main airport terminal, Federal Air has its own dedicated lounge with beverages, snacks, and bathrooms.  The aircraft are parked right outside the lounge — no jetway or staircase needed.  Our flight was 1.5 hours nonstop to Sabi Sabi, (there is a possibility for one or two quick stops to drop off or pickup other passengers staying in other areas within Sabi Sands). Be aware that time of flight departure is not confirmed until 24 hours prior, so make sure to include ample layover time in Joburg if making a connecting flight post safari.

Sabi Sabi South Africa

From the Sabi Sands landing strip it was a quick ride by Land Cruiser to Little Bush Camp

Micato Safaris, South AfricaAlso note that the luggage limit is 44 pounds per person (including carry on) since these are small bush planes (Cessna Grand Caravan or Beechraft 1900 are typical). We used soft-sided, rolling duffels (thank you Micato Safaris!) – hard-sided luggage is not allowed onboard.  Our plane held about 12 passengers and two pilots and was a smooth flight – the only real discomfort was from the lack of bathroom on board, so plan accordingly!

As you plan your South African safari, make sure to check government websites for information on proper shots and malaria pills, or consult with a travel doctor several months prior to departure in order to educate yourself on immunization recommendations.  Also, the South African government now requires that all children under the age of 18 must possess an unabridged version of their birth certificate (along with their passport) reflecting the particulars of the child’s parents. For more information (including documents required for children traveling with only one parent), click here.

Sabi Sands South Africa

More about Cape Buffalo in my next article

Stay tuned for my upcoming article and photos from our stay at Little Bush Camp and Sabi Sabi safari including notes on weather and packing.

 

 

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Cape Town’s Best Bets

Cape Town’s Best Bets

As I mentioned in my last post on Table Mountain National Park, no visit to South Africa is complete without a stay in Cape Town. Before you embark on a Kruger safari adventure, set aside a few days for some urban exploration. This coastal city overflows with natural wonders and historic sites so make sure to take time to cover it all:

Table Mountain National Park: Stretching across the Cape Peninsula from city-centered Table Mountain in the north to Cape Point in the south, this national park is exceptionally biodiverse. For more insight, please read my recent article.

V&A Waterfront, Cape Town

Photo-op at the V&A Waterfront

Kirstenbosch National Botanical Garden: Take a stroll on the Tree Canopy Walkway a curved, timber and steel bridge that hovers over the garden’s canopy of trees offering great views of the peninsula. Or, pack a picnic, and head for a hike up Table Mountain, which is easily accessible from here.

Robben Island, Cape Town

Robben Island

Robben Island: Required reading (or viewing) prior to a trip to South Africa is Nelson Mandela’s “Long Walk to Freedom,” the autobiographical work that chronicles the former president’s life and 27 years imprisoned on Robben Island. This UNESCO Site is accessed by way of ferry originating from the Nelson Mandela Gateway Museum at the V&A Waterfront. The 3.5 hour tour includes the ferry crossing, guided bus tour around the island, and visit to the maximum-security prison and the cell that housed Mandela, the global icon of bravery and freedom. Most memorable part of the tour? Meeting with a former political prison who recounts his own story of imprisonment and life under Apartheid.

Robben Island, Cape Town

Our tour of Robben Island was led by a former political prisoner

Robben Island, Cape Town

We met with prison guard (and author), Christo Brand, who formed a “friendship behind bars” with Mandela

Hooked on history? Try a Tunnel Tour and get an up close view of the underground canals that date back to 1652 and once served passing ships with fresh water. The District 6 Museum tells the story of citizens forcibly removed from this neighborhood by the Apartheid government. The Heart of Cape Town Museum celebrates the world’s first heart transplant. And, a tour through the Castle of Good Hope, Cape Town’s star-shaped, oldest surviving colonial building, will give you a perspective on the hardships of the city’s earliest days.

V&A Waterfront, Cape Town

Shop, eat, play, and step back in history at V&A Waterfront

V&A Waterfront: Perched on the Atlantic side of the Cape Peninsula, this historic dockland is a busy commercial harbor set in the midst of a bustling entertainment mecca. The Victoria & Alfred Waterfront boasts 450 shops (both local and international brands), 80 eateries, theatres, movies, and more. Visit The Watershed for an eclectic mix of indigenous crafts and the Market on the Wharf for artisanal food, fresh produce, and baked goods. Get out on the water with a boat charter, or catch a helicopter charter for a bird’s eye view of the city. Spend an afternoon at the Two Oceans Aquarium and dip a hand into marine tanks and touch pools, or stop at the predator tank to watch the sharks feed.

Nobel Square: Adjacent to the V&A Market, this square and its statues pay tribute to South Africa’s four Nobel Peace Prize Laureates: Nikosi Albert Luthuli, Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu, and former state presidents FW de Klerk and Nelson Mandela.

Nobel Square Cape Town

Nobel Square

Cape Town Diamond Museum: Located near the V&A Harbor Clock Tower, this “hidden gem” recounts the 1867 Diamond Rush in South Africa and the path a diamond takes from “in the rough” to ring-worthy final product.

Camps Bay: This trendy yet casual seaside resort at the foot of the Twelve Apostles Mountains (just ten minutes from downtown Cape Town) is known as the city’s Riviera and is fringed by a palm tree lined promenade with a thriving mix of sidewalk cafes and boutiques. The long stretch of beach has a tidal pool at the southern end, surfing at the northern end, and in between, a calm spot for swimming.

Stellenbosch: Surrounded by the Cape Winelands, this university town is known for its distinct Cape Dutch architecture, oak-shaded streets, and charming shops, patisseries, and artisanal bakeries. Spend the day exploring the never ending vineyard choices that rival California’s Napa Valley. Most notable is exclusive lodge Delaire Graff Winery with its gorgeous mountain views from its patio restaurants. Prefer a chocolate and Brandy tasting? Stop at Waterford Estate or Van Ryn. Continue your wine tasting tour in the vineyards near the village of Franschoek, also regarded for its galleries and antique shops.

Delaire Graff Estate, Cape Town

A gorgeous view from Delaire Graff Estate

Stellenbosch, Cape Town

The vivid mountain vistas of Stellenbosch

Delaire Graff Estate

Visit at sunset to catch those burnt sienna hues

Foodies: Restaurants in Cape Town boast exceptional chefs, locally sourced ingredients, and traditional South African game (including kudu, ostrich, and springbok). Enjoy seafood with a view at Harbor House at the V&A Waterfront. Kloof Street House takes its name from the hip street it resides on. Set in a Victorian building, it features a kitschy interior and brasserie-style menu. The Old Biscuit Mill, located in a formerly industrial area known as Woodstock, is actually a little village with an eclectic mix of farm stalls, artists’ workshops , restaurants, and seasonal festivals. Test Kitchen, is well-known for its inventive menu and creative flavors and ingredients. It’s tough to score a reservation at The Pot Luck Club dubbed “the coolest place in Cape Town,” but it’s worth a try to sample its innovative cuisine. Noordhoek’s Food Barn charms with its laid back, rustic atmosphere and truly farm to table menu. Visit the One & Only hotel for dinner at Reuben’s (in nice weather ask for an outside table overlooking the harbor) and make a stop in the lovely lobby lounge before or after your meal. Visiting Camp’s Bay? Take time for sushi at Paranga on the restaurant’s beach-view terrace.

Stay overnite: One & Only Cape Town (in the harbor area), Cape Grace Hotel (waterfront view), Camps Bay Retreat Hotel (set on a four-acre reserve), Twelve Apostles Hotel (borders Table Mountain National Park), and Tinstwalo Atlantic (a chic remote lodge on the shores of the Atlantic).

img_4304STAY TUNED FOR MY NEXT ARTICLE…
“Safari Adventures in South Africa”

 

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